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projects in incubation

Social Entrepreneurship, Art & Science (SEAS)

We invite you to a join us on an exploration of how art can interpret science in a manner that captures the imagination and motivates collective action on global issues such as climate change, invasive species, rural poverty & flight and land stewardship. Contact faye@forestfractal.com.

Tualatin Headwaters, Producers in Partnership

Bringing consumers and suppliers together via a cooperative grocer, the Tualatin Headwaters is raising awareness of the reality that a healthy food-shed requires a healthy watershed.  The Tualatin Headwaters producers include Hyla Woods, Ayers Creek Farm, Gales Meadows Farm, Fraga Farmstead Creamery and Montinore Estates.  Food Front Cooperative Grocery,  is a unique community asset owned by its members. Together, we are beginning an experiment…..
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n northwest Oregon we're making exciting progress in linking local quality products from quality stewardship with careful choices made by consumers who care.  Vegetable growers link with salad eaters - foresters supply furniture makers - a sheep's fleece is knitted into your warm winter hat - rain falling on your local forest miraculously flows into your drinking glass - and ranchers cooperate with BBQ-ers in ways that we never did before  These relationships positively share our rural landscapes and livelihoods while also improving alternatives to conventional products available to consumers.  We're working together to make these partnerships easy and tangible, and this is just the beginning!



 

Sustainable Rain Chains & Splash Blocks

Forest Fractal, in partnership with OCAC/PNCA MFA Applied Craft & Design and with the support of a 2010 - 2012 SPACE grant from East Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District, took on the challenge of stormwater conveyance, from roof top to rain garden.  Rain chains are often fabricated of copper.  Particles from rain chains & many other sources, especially vehicle brake pads, slough off into stormwater systems & rivers.  Copper particles confuse the sensory system of salmon, making them unable to know which direction is upstream.  Can we design beautiful & functional rain chains & splash blocks from a more sustainable materials palette?  YES!  MFA student teams participated in a design charrette, during a social enterprise course.  The winning entry, The Rain Drop Box, lead by MFA candidate Andy Lonnquist, was chosen by experts and the public at the community event, Welcome the Rain.  Andy was awarded a Phase II SPACE grant to help take the prototype to feasibility.  His 3D printed design and mock-up were on display at the October 2011 event.

Salmon in Cyberspace

Our first exploration, Salmon in Cyberspace, was a collaboration of PSU MBA graduate Jessica Hughes and PNCA BFA graduate MiKayla Gattuccio.  The team investigated the linkages between watershed health and individual daily behavior, including our role in the spread of invasive species and the increased demand on data centers being built along the mid-Columbia river.  Salmon in Cyberspace champions include Sam Chan OSU Sea Grant Extension, Scott Marshall PSU, Lennie Pitkin, PNCA and JP Reuer, OCAC/PNCA. 

Everything is Part of Everything

With this piece I am trying to encourage the viewer to recognize her/his role within the environment and  begin an understanding on how one's daily practices and behaviors greatly impact all matters, including water. These two pieces live separately but together as well, much like how many people feel that they do not impact such things as environmental changes; they become separate from these concerns. The left piece consists of images of water, anadromous fish, mapping of the Columbia River and the words, "Everything is Part of Everything". This allows the viewer to connect to a location and an idea, while the other piece on the right shows images of what the local community and global community are doing negatively and positively on a daily basis which in turn effect water quality. The viewer's eyes go back and forth between the two pieces, relating image to image and how one impacts another. The images on the right are  mainly regarding energy usage and over consumption and also sustainable energy practices. I hope the viewer leaves the piece thinking, "What do I do that effects water?" 
                                                                                              MiKayla Gattuccio, October 2009

Everything is Part of Everything - detail

  

Title: Everything is Part of Everything
Artist:  MiKayla Gattuccio, Salem OR USA
Size: 35.5X18 inches
Medium: Mixed Media/Found Materials


    The Silent Invasion

        
   Did you know....two internet searches equal the carbon footprint of boiling a kettle of water?        
   Consider how.....human behavior & global trade affect our waters & spread invasive species.

Title: Salmon in Cyberspace & Invasive Species Design Charrette
Artists: MFA Applied Craft & Design class exercise & NAAEE conference
October 2009


Biomimicry, The Game

 Forest Fractal's mission is to catalyze sustainable livelihoods for the people who live in forest biomes. We address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by enabling residents to diversify their income stream.  In a polarized North/South world, the North too often attempts to impose “solutions for development” on the South, rather than focusing on co-creation and what the South can teach the North.  Flipping this paradigm gives us access to the enormous intellectual capital resident in these endangered biomes. By contributing to the conservation economy and teaching us what they know about their forest habitat; residents gain options for enhanced economic income and quality of life.  So far, we have engaged with local residents and businesses, hosted a Biomimicry & Design workshop, convened an Art meets Science brainstorm and have developed some initial ideas about products and services. 

Our pilot project, Biomimicry, The Game, was developed by Peruvian eco-tourism guides.  Our prototype is being played at 3 eco-lodges in Tambopata, Peru.  If commercialized, The Game will generate resources for conservation in the Amazon while  inspiring people to look to Nature for sustainable solutions to modern life.